Gabriel//21//ColumbiaU

~

Baltimore native.
Manhattan resident.
Musician. Poet. Linguist.
Teacher-to-be.
Reblogged from vitataxia  1.160 note
stickyembraces:

Hegel’s last words, "And he didn’t understand me", were previously interpreted to refer to all of his students as a single person. However, his newly discovered notebooks indicate that during his final days Hegel developed his dialectic so far that he was able to predict the future movements of history in such detail that he realized the historical inevitability of a hyperactive Slovenian man explaining his Philosophy entirely through anal sex metaphors. This discovery haunted him until his final moments.

stickyembraces:

Hegel’s last words, "And he didn’t understand me", were previously interpreted to refer to all of his students as a single person. However, his newly discovered notebooks indicate that during his final days Hegel developed his dialectic so far that he was able to predict the future movements of history in such detail that he realized the historical inevitability of a hyperactive Slovenian man explaining his Philosophy entirely through anal sex metaphors. This discovery haunted him until his final moments.

Reblogged from nokiabae  341 note

Here’s the scenario: two children, one white and one black, walk into an exhibition filled with portraits of white people. Both children enjoy it. After the exhibition they make self-portraits out of food. The black child asks for brown ingredients – cocoa pops, hot chocolate powder – to represent his skin in the portrait. The white child does not bother with colour in the same way. Her whiteness is not a colour that needs to be marked or thought about, it is naturalized as normal, a seamless part of the wall-to-wall whiteness of the surrounding exhibition. On closer inspection the portraits show further nuances of colouring and also commonality. Other features such as nose, lips, eyes and hair were not represented mimetically. As the brown skin colour of the portrait on the left stands out because of its purposeful colouring, it creates a link between the child and their artwork, making visible what is taken for granted in this space – whiteness. By "Black people don’t go to galleries" - The Reproduction of Taste and Cultural Value (via mother-iron)

Reblogged from nokiabae  323 note

One trend we have noticed, with growing apprehension, is the ease with which the language of decolonization has been superficially adopted into education and other social sciences, supplanting prior ways of talking about social justice, critical methodologies, or approaches which decenter settler perspectives. Decolonization, which we assert is a distinct project from other civil and human rights-based social justice projects, is far too often subsumed into the directives of these projects, with no regard for how decolonization wants something different than those forms of justice. Settler scholars swap out prior civil and human rights based terms, seemingly to signal both an awareness of the significance of Indigenous and decolonizing theorizations of schooling and educational research, and to include Indigenous peoples on the list of considerations - as an additional special (ethnic) group or class. At a conference on educational research, it is not uncommon to hear speakers refer, almost casually, to the need to “decolonize our schools,” or use “decolonizing methods,” or “decolonize student thinking.” Yet, we have observed a startling number of these discussions make no mention of Indigenous peoples, our/their struggles for the recognition of our/their sovereignty, or the contributions of Indigenous intellectuals and activists to theories and frameworks of decolonization. Further, there is often little recognition given to the immediate context of settler colonialism on the North American lands where many of these conferences take place. By Decolonization is not a metaphor (via leibor)

Reblogged from elucipher  1.362 note

Oppressive language does more than represent violence; it is violence; does more than represent the limits of knowledge; it limits knowledge. Whether it is obscuring state language or the faux-language of mindless media; whether it is the proud but calcified language of the academy or the commodity driven language of science; whether it is the malign language of law-without-ethics, or language designed for the estrangement of minorities, hiding its racist plunder in its literary cheek - it must be rejected, altered and exposed.

It is the language that drinks blood, laps vulnerabilities, tucks its fascist boots under crinolines of respectability and patriotism as it moves relentlessly toward the bottom line and the bottomed-out mind. Sexist language, racist language, theistic language - all are typical of the policing languages of mastery, and cannot, do not permit new knowledge or encourage the mutual exchange of ideas. By Toni Morrison

Reblogged from terpsikeraunos  63 note

I don’t believe that there is “a specifically philosophical writing,” a sole philosophical writing whose purity is always the same and out of reach of all sorts of contaminations. And first of all for this overwhelming reason: philosophy is spoken and written in a natural language, not in an absolutely formalizable and universal language. That said, within this natural language and its uses, certain modes have been forcibly imposed (and there is a relation of force) as philosophical. The modes are multiple, conflictual, inseparable from the philosophical content itself and from its “theses.” A philosophical debate is also a combat in view of imposing discursive modes, demonstrative procedures, rhetorical and pedagogical techniques. Each time philosophy has been opposed, it was also, although not only, by contesting the properly, authentically philosophical character of the other’s discourse. By Jacques Derrida, “Is There A Philosophical Language?” (via heteroglossia)